magicalnaturetour:

I’m watching you (by Tomas Öhberg)

magicalnaturetour:

I’m watching you (by Tomas Öhberg)

3 days ago on October 16th, 2014 | J | 1,504 notes
rhamphotheca:

Police in Dubai stop traffic, so that an Egyptian Mastigure (Uromastyx aegyptia), aka Dhab, can cross the road.
(via: Dubai)

rhamphotheca:

Police in Dubai stop traffic, so that an Egyptian Mastigure (Uromastyx aegyptia), aka Dhab, can cross the road.

(via: Dubai)

4 days ago on October 16th, 2014 | J | 4,111 notes

onceuponatown:

Skeleton of horse, running. By Eadweard Muybridge. San Francisco c.1881.

4 days ago on October 16th, 2014 | J | 2,971 notes
10bullets:

(by karin ruchti)

10bullets:

(by karin ruchti)

1 week ago on October 7th, 2014 | J | 58 notes
teleos:

Ahi on Flickr.
RUN IT IS A DAGRON IN A HAT

teleos:

Ahi on Flickr.

RUN IT IS A DAGRON IN A HAT

1 week ago on October 7th, 2014 | J | 105 notes

autumncozy:

Cats in scarves in the fall.

1 week ago on October 7th, 2014 | J | 84,269 notes
magicalnaturetour:

2004-12-12 at 17-07-00 (by Jurgen Otto)

magicalnaturetour:

2004-12-12 at 17-07-00 (by Jurgen Otto)

2 weeks ago on October 5th, 2014 | J | 1,213 notes
biomorphosis:

Sleep eating Kangaroo.

biomorphosis:

Sleep eating Kangaroo.

2 weeks ago on October 3rd, 2014 | J | 19,566 notes

rhamphotheca:

Snake Poop and The Adaptive Ballast Hypothesis

by Andrew Durso

Most people probably spend as little time as possible thinking about poop, especially snake poop. Some animals produce enormous amounts of poop, like dairy cows. Others make lots of little poops - up to 50 a day in small birds.  

In contrast, snakes don’t poop much at all. In fact, because they eat so infrequently, snakes probably poop the least often of almost any animal. Anyone who has kept a snake as a pet can tell you that a few days after they’re fed, most snakes tend to poop once (often in their water bowls, for some annoying reason), and they might poop again within a few more days.

Like bird poop, snake poop is made up of two parts - the brown stuff (the fecal fragment, aka the actual poop) and the white stuff (the uric acid fragment, aka the pee, in a solid form). Also like birds, most reptiles use uric acid rather than urea to excrete their excess nitrogen, which helps them conserve water.

You wouldn’t think there would be much that’s interesting about snake poop, but to a snake biologist everything about snakes is interesting. In 2002, Harvey Lillywhite, Pierre de Delva, and Brice Noonan published a chapter in the book Biology of the Vipers that detailed their studies on snake poop.

Their most amazing finding was that some snakes can go for a really, really long time without pooping. As in, over a year. It’s not because they’re constipated though - these long fecal retention periods have actually evolved for a purpose in snakes.

Here’s what happens: most snakes eat very large meals, and they eat them all in one piece. That means that when a snake eats a meal, its body mass can more than double all at once, and it can only digest that meal from the outside in, because it hasn’t chewed or cut it up into small pieces to increase its surface area. Even for the insane digestive tract of a snake, this is an incredible feat…

(read more: Life is Short, Snakes Are Long)

photos: A. Durso, Pedro Rodriguez, and Cater News Agency

3 weeks ago on September 24th, 2014 | J | 478 notes
teleos:

Arete on Flickr.

teleos:

Arete on Flickr.

3 weeks ago on September 22nd, 2014 | J | 94 notes
4 weeks ago on September 20th, 2014 | J | 6,555 notes
jaws-and-claws:

Lynx getting….(Explored, my 101th) by Pewald on Flickr.

jaws-and-claws:

Lynx getting….(Explored, my 101th) by Pewald on Flickr.

4 weeks ago on September 20th, 2014 | J | 573 notes
nympherret:

What a nicely composed picture

nympherret:

What a nicely composed picture

1 month ago on September 19th, 2014 | J | 5,586 notes
amnhnyc:


Lonesome George, the last Pinta Island giant tortoise, was unveiled at the Museum this afternoon. He will be on public view for just over 3 months, through January 4, 2015. Museum scientists worked closely with taxidermy experts to preserve Lonesome George as he appeared in life. 
Learn more about Lonesome George. 

amnhnyc:

Lonesome George, the last Pinta Island giant tortoise, was unveiled at the Museum this afternoon. He will be on public view for just over 3 months, through January 4, 2015. Museum scientists worked closely with taxidermy experts to preserve Lonesome George as he appeared in life. 

Learn more about Lonesome George

1 month ago on September 18th, 2014 | J | 3,061 notes
sweetdeffect:

Snake fetus.

sweetdeffect:

Snake fetus.

1 month ago on September 18th, 2014 | J | 300 notes
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Animalia Chordata
Zoology fan extraordinaire. I know the blog is called Animalia Chordata, and with that name you might assume this blog only contains chordates, but you should know I'm a huge liar and any animal, topic, or weird gelatinous thing that catches my interest will show up on this blog, notochord or not. If you have any questions or requests, just shoot me a message and I'll see what I can do!
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